melons
What we call cantaloupes are really muskmelons. True cantaloupes are hard-shelled melons from Europe. Honeydew melons are different from muskmelons in that the skin is smooth, the flesh is green, and the scent is markedly different. Unlike muskmelons, honeydews can be stored for up to a month. Muskmelons stop ripening after being picked from the vine, but honeydews will continue to ripen a bit, though vine-ripening is best.

In cool areas, black plastic mulch can be used to warm the soil and keep weeds down. Melons use a lot of water while they are growing, but taste best if ripened under drier conditions. Set ripening fruit on a soft bed of straw, or a coffee can to keep moisture from damaging the fruit. Melons also grow well on a trellis, which saves space and increases airflow, helping to prevent fungal diseases.

When to Sow Outside: RECOMMENDED: 1 to 2 weeks after average last frost, and when soil temperature is at least 70 degrees F - ideally 70 degrees F to 90 degrees F.
   
Melon Muskmelon/Cantaloupe
Heart of Gold

Latin Name: Cucumis Melo


  • WARM SEASON 80 DAYS Sow after last chance of spring frost
  • HEIRLOOM with an old-fashioned, sweet flavor, this 1980s favorite still wins taste tests. A short-season summer treat, homegrown melons can't be beat!
melons
   
Melon Honeydew
Sweet Delight

Latin Name: Cucumis Melo (Indorous group)


  • WARM SEASON 90 DAYS Sow after last chance of spring frost
  • Far surpassing store-bought melons, the wonderful, vine-ripened flavor of this sweet, juicy variety is a real treat!
melons
 
Melon Muskmelon/Cantaloupe
Minnesota Midget

Latin Name: Cucumis Melo


  • WARM SEASON 60-70 DAYS Sow after last chance of spring frost
  • Single serving size of juicy, sweet fruit right down to the rind! Small plants take less garden space. Perfect for containers too.
melons
 
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